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Richard Roeper Blog

RR Prediction: Nominees for the 87th Annual Academy Awards

January 14th, 2015


​This thing called buzz, I just can’t fathom it.

​I’ve seen thousands of movies and I’ve covered dozens of awards shows. At least a few times every year, I’ll emerge from the cocoon of the screening room convinced I’ve just seen a nomination-worthy performance or film.

​And then a month later the movie is already disappearing from theaters, having created not even the slightest hint of a buzz.

​To be sure, some films and performances ARE sure things. I don’t know anyone in the business that saw “Birdman” and DIDN’T think Michael Keaton would get a Best Actor nomination. You’d be hard-pressed to find any industry analyst who doesn’t believe “Boyhood” will get a Best Picture nomination.

​The nominees for the 87th annual Academy Awards will be announced Thursday morning. Here are my predictions for the most popular categories, with a few runners-up in the Big Five.

Best Picture

​“Boyhood”

​“Birdman”

​“Foxcatcher”

​“The Grand Budapest Hotel”’

​“Gone Girl”

​“The Imitation Game”

​“Selma”

​“The Theory of Everything”

​“Whiplash”

​Just missing the cut: “Nightcrawler,” “Interstellar,” “American Sniper”

Best Actress

​Amy Adams, “Big Eyes”​

Marion Cotillard, “Two Days/One Night”

​Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”

​Rosamund Pike, “Gone Girl”

​Reese Witherspoon, “Wild”

​Just missing the cut: Felicity Jones, “The Theory of Everything,” Jennifer Aniston, “Cake”

Best Actor

​Steve Carell, “Foxcatcher”

​Benedict Cumberbatch, “The Imitation Game”

​Michael Keaton, “Birdman”

​David Oyelowo, “Selma”

​Eddie Redmayne, “The Theory of Everything”

​Just missing the cut: Bradley Cooper, “American Sniper,” Ralph Fiennes, “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” Jake Gyllenhaal, “Nightcrawler,” Oscar Isaac, “A Most Violent Year”

Best Supporting Actress

​Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”

​Jessica Chastain, “A Most Violent Year”

​Laura Dern, “Wild”

​Keira Knightley, “The Imitation Game”

​Emma Stone, “Birdman”

​Just missing the cut: Meryl Streep, “Into the Woods,” Tilda  Swinton, “Snowpiercer”

Best Supporting Actor

​Ethan Hawke, “Boyhood”

​Robert Duvall, “The Judge’

​Edward Norton, “Birdman”

​Mark Ruffalo, “Foxcatcher”

​J.K Simmons, “Whiplash”

​Just missing the cut: Josh Brolin, “Inherent Vice,” Tom Wilkinson, “Selma,” Christoph Waltz, “Big Eyes”

Best Director

​Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

​Ana DuVernay, “Selma”

​David Fincher, “Gone Girl”

​Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, “Birdman”

​Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”

Best Animated Film

​“Big Hero 6”

​“The Book of Life”

​“The Boxtrolls”

​“How to Train Your Dragon 2”

​“The Lego Movie”

TRAILER: Melissa McCarthy’s latest movie ‘Spy’

January 13th, 2015

72nd Golden Globes

January 11th, 2015

As is the case with almost every awards show, they wait until the very end to do the half-dozen categories of most interest to the home audience — so we get the obligatory jokes about how the show is running late, and some of the biggest and most accomplished stars in the world find themselves rushing to finish their speeches while the dreaded “play-off” music kicks in.

I admired Eddie Redmayne’s work in “The Theory of Everything, but I would have voted for David Oyelowo’s work in “Selma” or Steve Carell’s performance in “Foxcatcher.”

Julianne Moore won Best Drama Actress for “Still Alice.” In a month and a half, she’ll be adding an Oscar to her trophy case. Same goes for Michael Keaton in “Birdman,” J.K. Simmons in “Whiplash” and Patricia Arquette in “Boyhood.” Your four acting Oscar winners are pretty much solidified, folks. Not because they won the Golden Globes (though that doesn’t hurt) but because they’re the clear favorites in their respective categories.

I’m not surprised the HFPA selected “The Grand Budapest Hotel” in that bizarre Comedy or Musical category. It wasn’t my favorite entry (that would be “Birdman”), but it’s the kind of movie the voters love.

As is the case with almost every awards show, they wait until the very end to do the half-dozen categories of most interest to the home audience — so we get the obligatory jokes about how the show is running late, and some of the biggest and most accomplished stars in the world find themselves rushing to finish their speeches while the dreaded “play-off” music kicks in.

I admired Eddie Redmayne’s work in “The Theory of Everything, but I would have voted for David Oyelowo’s work in “Selma” or Steve Carell’s performance in “Foxcatcher.”

Julianne Moore won Best Drama Actress for “Still Alice.” In a month and a half, she’ll be adding an Oscar to her trophy case. Same goes for Michael Keaton in “Birdman,” J.K. Simmons in “Whiplash” and Patricia Arquette in “Boyhood.” Your four acting Oscar winners are pretty much solidified, folks. Not because they won the Golden Globes (though that doesn’t hurt) but because they’re the clear favorites in their respective categories.

I’m not surprised the HFPA selected “The Grand Budapest Hotel” in that bizarre Comedy or Musical category. It wasn’t my favorite entry (that would be “Birdman”), but it’s the kind of movie the voters love.

9:32 p.m.

Perhaps the most stunning sight at the Golden Globes: George Clooney wearing a wedding ring.

Clooney has been nominated in more categories than anyone in the history of the Golden Globes, so even though he’s just 53, it didn’t seem premature for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to give him the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award. The montage of movies Clooney has directed, produced and/or starred in was a reminder of one of the most remarkable careers of the last 20 years.

A number of favorites did take home the Globe, including J. K. Simmons for “Whiplash,” Patricia Arquette for “Boyhood” (they’ll both win supporting trophies on Oscar night as well); Kevin Spacey getting a well-deserved Globe for “House of Cards”; and Richard Linklater honored for his directing on the masterful “Boyhood.”

The pre-game festivities on the red carpet were entertaining as always. NBC morning stars Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie seemed uncomfortable interviewing Matthew McConaughey et al.; Guthrie in particular was having a hard time, as she kept the microphone close to her mouth when SHE was talking, but held it way too low when the SUBJECT was talking.

8:29 p.m.

We’ve had a couple of surprises already, including:

• “How to Train Your Dragon 2” winning Best Animated Feature over the superior “The Lego Movie” and “Big Hero 6.”

• Amy Adams winning Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy for “Big Eyes,” which I thought was actually a drama when I saw it. Emily Blunt was the favorite for “Into the Woods,” but I agree with the Hollywood Foreign Press on this one. Adams said she couldn’t have been less prepared — and she went on to prove it in a sincere but nearly incoherent speech.

• Not surprising: Ricky Gervais taking the stage with a glass of ale and proceeding to skewer Hollywood royalty in his typically precision-perfect fashion.

• As for Prince’s surprise appearance: even bigshot Hollywood stars whooped it up when he walked onstage sporting round sunglasses and some sort of walking stick, leading me to wonder for a moment if poor Prince had been struck blind.

No, he’s just the same silly genius he’s always been.

7:18 p.m.

The dynamic duo of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler killed it in their opening monologue, delivering smart, slightly edgy one-liners that poked fun at the audience and the silliness of show business while clearly enjoying what they said will be their last time co-hosting.

Yes, they went after Bill Cosby, trading bad imitations of Cosby as the audience laughed uncomfortably, if there’s such a thing as laughing uncomfortably.

Fey and Poehler stayed with the semi-snark throughout their monologue, making no mention of Paris. Instead, they noted Reese Witherspoon “did her own walking” in “The Wild.” They said a real-life painting of “Big Eyes” was in the audience — and the camera cut to Emma Stone, who didn’t seem thrilled to be the target of the joke. They called out Joaquin Phoenix, who said awards shows are nonsense and yet was in attendance.

Tina Fey cited Amal Clooney’s amazing accomplishments as a lawyer, human rights activist and author and cracked, “So tonight her HUSBAND is getting a lifetime achievement award.”

Great stuff. I’m gonna miss those two co-hosting this thing.

6:50 p.m.

Why bring a date when you work in a plug for your movie or your TV show?

From “The Boy Next Door” to “Girls” to “House of Cards,” co-stars appeared together on the red carpet to chat up their latest projects.

Meanwhile, the lovely but low-key Amal Clooney looked like she WISHED her husband had brought along a co-star — especially when Giuliana Ranci whipped out a bottle of Clooney’s Casamigos Tequilia and tried to get George and Amal to join her in a shot.

Amal was having none of it. George said he’d be at the bar after the show, but he said he was speaking at the awards and it wouldn’t be a good idea for him to drink beforehand, given what’s happened in the past when he tried that combo.

A game Giuliana downed a shot and said it was smooth.

George and Amal smiled.

Awkwardness prevailed.

6:16 PM

From the button on George Clooney’s lapel to the button on Amal Clooney’s purse to the signs held by Kathy Bates, Joshua Jackson and even some of the photographers, “Je Suis Charlie” was the dominant message on the red carpet of the Golden Globes.

Helen Mirren sported a pen-pin and explained it was to support, “Free speech…against the Charlie Hebdo atrocity. A reminder for all of us to stand behind the ideal of free speech.”

And why not. Say what you will about actors getting involved in politics—and I’ve never understood why it’s a bad thing for celebrities to get involved in noble causes—but actors and writers and directors are artists, and they’re as outraged as anyone else by the slaughter in Paris.

As Aud Berggren Morisse goes, so go the Globes.
Well. It’s not just good old Aud Berggren Morisse. Gilda Baum-Lappe, Tina Johnk Christensen, Yola Czaderska-Hayek and of course The Kingma had something to say about the winners as well.
The aforementioned are members in good standing of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, that small body of international entertainment, um, journalists, who determine the nominees and the winners of the Golden Globes.
There are just 85 members in the HFPA—some of them full-time entertainment journalists, others part-timers. They hail from Egypt, Italy, France, Australia, Mexico, Canada and a dozen other countries. The largest contingent is from Germany, which boasts some 10 members.
As most of you know, the Golden Globes used to be a joke. There was a time when nobody even wanted to televise the awards. Now, the Globes are second only to the Academy Awards in the minds of most fans—and many in the entertainment industry.
You can win a Golden Globe with as few as 18 votes. Carry Germany and you’re halfway there!

The dynamic duo of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are hosting once again this year, so that’s a win right there. Here’s my take on who else will be coming home a winner this year. (I’m doing just the movie categories, as I haven’t seen enough of some of the nominated TV shows and actors to give a fair assessment.)

Best Motion Picture, Drama
“Boyhood”
“Foxcatcher”
“The Imitation Game”
“Selma”
“The Theory of Everything”
Will win: “Boyhood”
Should win: “Boyhood”

Best Actor, Drama
Steve Carrell, “Foxcatcher”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “The Imitation Game”
Jake Gyllenhaal, “Nightcrawler”
David Oyelowo, “Selma”
Eddie Redmayne, “The Theory of Everything”
Will win: Eddie Redmayne
Should win: Steve Carrell

Best Actress, Drama
Jennifer Aniston, “Cake”
Felicity Jones, “The Theory of Everything”
Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”
Rosamund Pike, “Gone Girl”
Reese Witherspoon, “Wild”
Will win: Julianne Moore
Should win: Julianne Moore

Best Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
“Birdman”
“The Grand Budapest Hotel”
“Into the Woods”
“Pride”
“St. Vincent”
Will win: “Birdman”
Should win: “Birdman”

Best Actor, Comedy or Musical
Ralph Fiennes, “Grand Budapest Hotel”
Michael Keaton, “Birdman”
Bill Murray, “St. Vincent”
Joaquin Phoenix, “Inherent Vice”
Christoph Waltz, “Big Eyes”
Will win: Michael Keaton
Should win: Michael Keaton

Best Actress, Comedy or Musical
Amy Adams, “Big Eyes”
Emily Blunt, “Into the Woods”
Helen Mirren, “The Hundred Foot Journey”
Julianne Moore, “Maps to the Stars”
Quvenzhane Walls, “Annie”
Will win: Emily Blunt, “Into the Woods”
Should win: Amy Adams, “Big Eyes”

Best Supporting Actor
Robert Duvall, “The Judge”
Ethan Hawke, “Boyhood”
Edward Norton, “Birdman”
Mark Ruffalo, “Foxcatcher”
J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”
Will win: J.K. Simmons
Should win: J.K. Simmons

Best Supporting Actress
Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”
Jessica Chastain, “A Most Violent Year”
Keira Knightley, “The Imitation Game”
Emma Stone, “Birdman”
Meryl Streep, “Into the Woods”
Will win: Patricia Arquette
Should win: Jessica Chastain

Best Director
Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Ava DuVernay, “Selma”
David Fincher, “Gone Girl”
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, “Birdman”
Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”
Will win: Richard Linklater
Should win: Richard Linklater

Best Screenplay
Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Gillian Flynn, “Gone Girl”
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Nicolas Giacbone, Alexander Dinelaris, Armando Bo, “Birdman”
Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”
Graham Moore, “The Imitation Game”
Will win: Wes Anderson
Should win: Inarritu et al.

Best Original Score
Alexandre Desplat, “The Imitation Game”
Johann Johannsson, “The Theory of Everything”
Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, “Gone Girl”
Antonio Sanchez, “Birdman”
Hans Zimmer, “Interstellar”
Will win: Antonio Sanchez
Should win: Antonio Sanchez

Best Original Song
“Big Eyes” from “Big Eyes”
“Glory” from “Selma”
“Mercy Is” from “Noah”
“Opportunity” from Annie
“Yellow Flicker Beat” from “The Hunger Games”
Will win: “Glory Is”
Should win: “Yellow Flicker Beat”

Best Animated Film
“Big Hero 6”
“The Book of Life”
“The Boxtrolls”
“How to Train Your Dragon 2”
“The Lego Movie”
Will win: “Big Hero 6”
Should win: “The Lego Movie”

Best Foreign Language Film
“Force Majeure”
“Get: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem”
“Ida”
“Leviathan”
“Tangerines”
Will win: “Force Majeure”
Should win: “Leviathan”

The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: Sitcoms/ Real World/ Charlie Hebdo

January 8th, 2015

Roeper Rundown: Trump Commentary, Chris Christie, and the Cowboys

January 5th, 2015

Marvel’s Ant-Man Teaser Preview

January 4th, 2015

Roeper Rundown: The Year in Movies

December 30th, 2014

“The Interview” Gets New Life

December 23rd, 2014

   When Sony Pictures announced last week it wouldn’t be showing “The Interview” in theaters, I heard from a few conspiracy theorists that said this was all a publicity stunt.
Now Sony IS authorizing Christmas Day screenings in a few markets (and most likely a Video On Demand release as well), I’m still gonna say I don’t think the North Korean government, rogue hackers, the largest theater chains in North America, Sony Pictures, Seth Rogen, James Franco, Kim Jong-Un and Dennis Rodman all got together and mapped out a strategy to maximize publicity for a relatively small social satire.
I think having Rogen and Franco do the talk show and premiere circuit would done just fine.
“We have never given up on releasing ‘The Interview’ and we’re excited our movie will be in a number of theaters on Chritsmas Day,” said Sony Chairman Michael Lynton in a statement.
The Plaza Theater in Atlanta said it will be on of the theaters showing the film. Tim League of the Alamo Drafthouse Theaters Tweeted he’ll “be making shows available [in Austin, Tx.,] within the hour.” (As of this writing, I don’t have confirmation of any Chicago-area screenings.)
Not sure how many moviegoers will now skip “Into the Woods” for “The Interview,” but at least now if you want to see it, you’re going to be able to see it.
No word from Sony about the reasoning behind this change of heart. Maybe it was the fact even the president of the United States said they were making a mistake in declining to release it. Maybe they finally realized if you cave once to a threat, you’re already on one knee and someone’s probably going to threaten you again—and if you keep on pulling movies from theaters because of threats, you might as well stop making movies.

Roeper Rundown: The Interview

December 17th, 2014

Roeper Rundown: Best Movies of 2014

December 17th, 2014

 
 
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